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Vision Research

Vision Research has to become a top priority on the agenda of all decision makers in Europe!

An impairment of vision or even complete blindness has a debilitating impact on the quality of life of the affected person, their relatives and friends and to the economic and social systems as a whole. This factor stimulated many European countries to dedicate resources to investigate the visual system and the underlying processes. Hence, the current social and economic developments and requirements in Europe necessitate for a better support, coordination and orientation of research in the field of visual sciences.

Key steps are a better integration of basic, clinical and applied research efforts, a clear definition of policies and guidelines, an efficient collaboration between the public and private sector together with a substantial increase of information and knowledge transfer activities.

Vision in the European Focus

EVI Top List of Women in European Vision Research and Ophthalmology 2021

The European Vision Institute is thrilled to announce the “TOP LIST of excellent Women in European Vision Research and Ophthalmology 2021”.
» EVI Top List of Women in European Vision Research and Ophthalmology 2021

Tracking the traces of light in the short-lived memory of the eyes

The traces light leaves on the retina close gaps in visual perception and provide continuity in knowing what is where as we move.
» Tracking the traces of light in the short-lived memory of the eyes

Scientists discover gene therapy provides neuroprotection to prevent glaucoma vision loss

A form of gene therapy protects optic nerve cells and preserves vision in mouse models of glaucoma, according to research supported by NIH's National Eye Institute. The findings suggest a way forward for developing neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma, a leading cause of visual impairment and...
» Scientists discover gene therapy provides neuroprotection to prevent glaucoma vision loss

Breakthrough in research on age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries affecting seven million in total in Germany, from which 500,000 people are suffering from late stage disease, around half of whom are registered as visually impaired. There are two forms of AMD, ‘wet’...
» Breakthrough in research on age-related macular degeneration